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Deer Farming Facts
Updated: 03-17-2013 12:00:27

By Todd Landt

                Deer Farming Facts

The following States do not have any “Farm Deer” herds, however they do have Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the wild herd: Wyoming, Maryland, Virginia and New Mexico  Source: North American Deer Farmers Association

The following states have Chronic Wasting Disease in the wild, but not in Farmed Deer herds: North Dakota, West Virginia and Illinois  Source: North American Deer Farmers Association

The persistence of CWD in wild cervid populations and our current lack of knowledge about the transmission of CWD have made the goal of eliminating CWD from farmed or captive cervids impractical”  Source: Federal Register Vo. 77 No.114, June 13, 2012/Rules and Regulations page 35544 paragraph one.

“Because our goal is now to control the spread of CWD rather than to eliminate it, we are not requiring States to conduct surveillance for CWD in wild cervid populations” Source: Federal Register Vol. 77, No. 114/Wednesday, June 13, 2012/Rules and Regulations page 35544 paragraph 4

As of November 28, 2012 the Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship has 147 farm deer herds enrolled in Iowa’s Chronic Wasting Disease Program. Source: IDALS December 5th, Iowa Whitetail Deer Association Newsletter

The Iowa Farmed Cervid Industry worked with Iowa regulatory agencies to develop a comprehensive monitoring program and has been proactive with testing, monitoring for disease and complying with rules and regulations all with the intent of promoting a healthy industry.

 “The total impact of the industry, combining the farming and hunting components, is $3.0 billion annually”- Iowa’s estimated value is $57.5 million.  Source:   Economic Impact of the United States Cervid Farming Industry, Agricultural and Food Policy Center, Texas A&M University 2007

Fencing Study - “We determined 100% deterrence rates during 5 additional experiments with different deer and the test fence at 2.4 m, a common height of fences at captive deer facilities” (note: 2.4 m = 7.87 ft.) Source: Journal of Wildlife Management 74(6): 1378-1381; 2010; DOI: 10.2193/2008-463. Under Abstract portion of article

Since 2002, the Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship with the Chronic Wasting Disease Program has submitted 4,697 CWD laboratory submissions for testing.   There are a total of 4,417 Cervidae in Iowa’s CWD Program.  Source: IDALS December 5th, Iowa Whitetail Deer Association Newsletter

Since 2002, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources has tested 42,853 wild deer and 3034 preserve deer (The wild herd size was estimated at 350,000 - Source: Trends in Iowa Wildlife Populations and Harvest 2011)

Wisconsin Deer Herd - “In addition, the statewide estimated deer population has remained above management goals for approximately the last 25 years.” Source:  Final Report Recommendations by, Wisconsin White-Tailed Deer Trustee and Review Committee June, 2012.  Drs. James C. Kroll (Trustee), David C. Guynn Jr. (Committee Member), and Gary L Alt (Committee Member)

“Avian scavengers, such as American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), have potential to translocate infectious agents (prions) of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases including chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy”……” Our results suggest a larger proportion of crows that consume prion-positive tissue are capable of passing infectious prions in their feces (P=1.o, 95%, CI: 0.8-1.0)  Therefore, this common migratory North American scavenger could play a role in the geographic spread of TSE diseases” source: Prion Remains Infectious after Passage through Digestive System of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) Kurt C. VerCauteren, John L. Pilon, Paul B. Nash, Gregory E. Philips, Justin W. Fischer

 

                        There has never been a “Farmed Deer” in Iowa die of CWD